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Thread: Dyslexia and TOG

  1. #1
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    Jun 2008
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    Frisco Texas
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    2
    Do any of you have a dyslexic reader? How have you approached the reading assignments? I desire excellence and hard work, but am not sure if there needs to be any adjustments to his assignments. He is in 6th grade and is midway through a language therapy program teaching him strategies to read well.

  2. #2
    Member
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    Jan 2008
    Location
    Whitman, MA
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    Yes, my son also has been diagnosed with Dyslexia. I am using the UG books for him to read on his own, and if there is just too much for him to accomplish I read them aloud. I am trying to help him take on more and more of the reading. He is considered 7th this year. We are currently working Yr 3R.

    But I also include him in on the discussions with his older brother who is reading the D level and some R level, because mentally he is there even though reading, and writing wise he is not.
    BJ
    Homeschooled from the beginning
    Boys 15, 13, 9, 7, 5 Girl 1

  3. #3
    I too have a daughter who struggles with reading. I get as many of her books on CD or tapes as I can, and the others we read together. Using some UG books is a good idea. We just have to plan more time in our school day to get through the reading. It is time well spent!!!!

  4. #4
    Guest
    I just came across this thread and thought I'd share a great resource I just discovered. My son is in 9th grade and dyslexic. We just joined Reading for the Blind and Dyslexic (www.RFBD.org). They have an amazing number of recorded books -- many of them by authors not found in the library book-on-tape selections (books by Genevieve Foster, Bethlehem books, Allen French, etc.). An individual membership is $35 a year for 35 books (with a one-time sign up fee of $65). You can either download the books directly to your computer, or get a CD that's able to be played on your computer. We're really enjoying them!

    Hope this helps,

    Nancy

  5. #5
    Member
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    Apr 2004
    Location
    WA
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    5
    I have a son who is dyslexic. Here is what I did with him. He is 8th grade this year.
    4th grade year, he sat in on all the LG reading aloud. I kept everyone in that level together. Grade 5 I gently moved him to the UG literature but kept him in the LG history as I read aloud. I go as many of his books on tape/CD WITH the books themselves from the library for him to read along with. This seemed to help some.
    Grade 6 - moved his history up to UG and he was full time UG (Church History has been covered at the middle child's level - LG for this year)
    Grade 7 - started as full time UG and in mid/late Jan. Moved Literature studies to D level (again with as many of them audio with the book for reading along. He has never been aloud to only listen to the audio - I have always made him follow along to help him in improving his reading - it has done this)
    Grade 8 - he is full time D level with discussion group this year (I didn't require this of him last year). Again as much of the Lit. in audio with book the book to read along.
    My son has the same type of dyslexia that I have. Neither of us reverse letters or numbers but we do switch them in words. So for instance the left might be consistantly read as felt (switching the f and the t in the word creating a new word that doesn't fit and then we do not comprehend what we are reading). Reading and following along with the audio version has really helped my ds get much better and more confident in his reading. I have NEVER let it be an excuse to not learn or try to "over come" (which really dyslexia is never over come but you do learn to compensate for your weak areas. Just as a blind person compensates with strengthening their hearing. I have also used a computer based phonics program made specifically for the dyslexic, based on the orting-gillingham method. It has worked wonders in his ability to read. It is called Phonics Tutor. I recomend it only for a child who has started or is very familiar with the keyboard on the computer. I would say around 10 or 11 is good. It is not like a computer game. No special graphics or game like play. It is phonics lessons, with spelling and dictation too. It is a bit pricey but I have considered my money very well spent. My sons use frequent words as they were not struggling as much to read at a third grade level but were struggling getting past this level. They are now fully past this level, still using FW and doing well (not to grade level yet but will be at some point). My friend's dd was struggling to get to the 3rd grade level and also has some speach issues. She used the Phonics Tutor classic as it takes things at a much slower pace. This has been GREAT for her and she is now able to read all the UG level books on her own. She isn't able to keep up with the TOG pace but she is doing great anyway and the speed will come with continued practice. My friend liked it so much that she gave us back our copy and bought her own. She is even using it with her ds who is a great reader and he is only getting better with it.
    HTH
    Patty in WA
    Trisch Mama of 4
    "Therefore encourage one another and build each other up, just as in fact you are doing." 1Thessalonians 5:11

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Maine
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    4
    I have a almost 12 year old son who is dyslexic and also dysgraphic. We have worked sooooo hard!!
    This year he is in 6th and doing UG. We decided to split the year in half. I supplement for my other kids if needed. But this lets him take the literature books slower without the pressure.
    I like TOG because he is such a smart kid and he loves all of the history. He is able to interact with his Rhetoric brother and be involved in those discussions and I am amazed at what he remembers.
    He is a visual/spatial learner in every way and very much a "typical dyslexic". He has incredible memory skills and a grasp on the abstract from a very young age.
    I use writing and spelling curriculums that help in his weak areas.
    In Christ,
    Karen Twombly
    Come visit : peacefulgatherings.blogspot.com

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