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Thread: Wk2 Writing topics

  1. #1
    Guest
    I feel like I am asking a dumb question, but as we are working on the prewriting section with graphic organizers today (our Monday), where do we find the answers to the topics? (Organization of a Benedictine Monastery, and Church's view of baptism with the Byzantine's view).
    Should I teach the writing skill and then they will encounter these answers as they do their writing this week? Or do we look for these answers on internet, etc. and then write on them. Does anyone give examples of what these finished graphic organizers should look like?
    HELP!!!
    Jeanine

  2. #2
    Jeanine,
    I usually have my son (UG) do his prewriting AFTER he's completed the majority of his reading so he has some familiarity with the topic. So, maybe on Tuesday, late morning or early afternoon.
    HTH

  3. #3
    This is not a dumb question because I posed a similar one on the TOGLooseThreads and haven't heard back from anyone on it.

    My question was
    Can anyone tell me how my son is to do the line diagram on artistic achievements of the Byzantine culture? Looking very briefly at the books assigned on the yellow spread, I don't see anything about Byzantine artistic achievements. I'd also like to know what a line diagram looks like. I can find all kinds of graphic organizers, but no line diagram and not having the Writing Aids supplement. I've searched on line and the first link I found on google was actually Year 1 Week 2 Level 5 of the writing sheet on pdf. Must be offered as a sample on line, quite ironic.

    Anyway, any help would be appreciated.
    2CO 4:1 Therefore, since through God's mercy we have this ministry, we do not lose heart.[5] For we do not preach ourselves, but Jesus Christ as Lord, and ourselves as your servants for Jesus' sake. [6] For God, who said, "Let light shine out of dark

  4. #4
    Vice President
    Lampstand Press

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Posts
    264
    Hi ladies,

    We suggest that the actual writing not take place until after discussion has taken place. This is part of our "read-think-write" view. The student reads at the beginning of the week; through discussions, you help him think about what he's read. Then, he writes about what he's read and thought about.

    All graphic organizers are on the CD that comes with Writing Aids. In the back of the Writing Aids book are samples of completed graphic organizers.

    For those that don't own Writing Aids, look at the links to each of the Year-Plans in the navigation bar at the top of this page. Click on your Year-Plan, and then "writing." Although they need updating, there are a great many of the needed graphic organizers and other helps linked by week.

    Hope this helps,
    Dana C. in TN
    Vice President
    Lampstand Press

    "Let my teaching fall like rain and my words descend like dew,
    like showers on new grass, like abundant rain on tender plants.
    I will proclaim the name of the Lord. Oh, praise the greatness of our God!"
    Deut. 32:2-4

  5. #5
    Guest
    That's confusing to me. That would mean that my ds would only have a little time to actually do the writing each week (like a Thurs/Fri) depending on when you have your discussion. Correct? I see where it is broken down into pieces each week, but how does that work with an older student (high school). They can't possibly have the time to do ALL that reading, in time for a LONG discussion, THEN write a decent paper in a couple of days. Does it just go faster than what I'm thinking?


    We suggest that the actual writing not take place until after discussion has taken place. This is part of our "read-think-write" view. The student reads at the beginning of the week; through discussions, you help him think about what he's read. Then, he writes about what he's read and thought about.

  6. #6
    Vice President
    Lampstand Press

    Join Date
    Apr 2002
    Location
    Kingsport, TN
    Posts
    264
    Hi,
    Yes, after a student knows how to do the assignment, it really takes less than an hour to do an essay from start to finish. Writing assignments that require research, such as reports or research papers are a different ball of wax and can be worked on throughout the week.

    Here's my breakdown:
    *Monday: The student reads about *how* to write an essay (or whatever) from his handbook or Talking Points in Writing Aids. This takes about 10 minutes typically.
    *Tuesday: I go over with him the format of an essay to make sure he understands *how* to do it. Again, this takes about 10 minutes.
    *Wednesday: We have discussion time. I try to make sure that we've talked about the topic matter that he will write about.
    *Thursday: He does the prewriting on the graphic organizer or other paper, and the rough draft on the computer. He prints it up and turns it in to me. This can take the student up to 45 minutes or an hour.
    *Friday: After I've looked it over with red pen in hand, I give it back to him so that he can correct things I've noticed. There have been many occasions, especially at the start of a new year, when I make him start back at the beginning because his prewriting didn't give him enough information to write a decent essay. (If this is the case then it will give him additional work the following Monday and/or Tuesday.)

    So, yes, I think it goes faster once you get into the swing of things.
    Dana C. in TN
    Vice President
    Lampstand Press

    "Let my teaching fall like rain and my words descend like dew,
    like showers on new grass, like abundant rain on tender plants.
    I will proclaim the name of the Lord. Oh, praise the greatness of our God!"
    Deut. 32:2-4

  7. #7
    Guest
    Thanks, Dana, that helps. I really wasn't wanting to have my UG/D level son read so much over the weekend, but if it takes, then I guess it just does. I did it differently this week where he read M-W, discuss today, and started on the prewriting today, but then I got confused until I read this thread. There really wasn't info in my son's reading about organizing a monastery, only what he had to infer from his reading of St. Benedict. Then I looked through the Teacher's notes and found the info he needed. I used the D level discussion outline which didn't even mention anything about the monastaries, so it through both of us for a loop. I'll have to go back and discuss it with him.

    I'm still not sure on how to guide him without telling him how to use the g.o.

  8. #8
    Hi,

    I have a follow-up question for Dana too.

    This is how we usually schedule our writing for the week.

    Monday-introduce the writing assignment and topic for that week.
    Tuesday: They begin pre-writing with graphic organizers. We have not had our discussion at this point, but this is mostly factual information that is being organized.
    Wednesday: We have discussion time and sometimes begin rough draft.
    Thursday: We begin/complete rough draft or have them revise their work with fresh eyes before turning it in to me.
    Friday: final draft

    This schedule worked well for us last year. My children are not having trouble doing the pre-writing on Tuesday, so I think it's working out fine that we're doing it before discussion. Of course, they can always add more content as a result of our discussion.

    My question is how to manage this with my Dialectic student this year, since he is in a co-op. We are not doing our one on one discussions each Wednesday like we did last year, because he meets with a group of students for co-op every other week. Part of their meeting is a discussion that follows the outline in the Teacher Notes. I don't want to do it with him and then have him repeat it in co-op. Do you have a suggestion for how to accomplish the "read, think, write" in this situation? We do read aloud as a family from several history sources just because we love to read together. This does generate discussion, but it is very informal and quite different from the discussion we had weekly last year. I have not noticed my student struggling to make connections or lacking in ideas for his writing, but then we are just getting started. Am I missing something important in the writing process by structuring things this way? I hadn't really thought about it until I read this discussion on the forum. I will go and reread my introductory notes on writing to think this through a bit more. If you have any experience or suggestions for us, that would be great. What do others do who have bi-monthly co-op meetings?

    Thanks,
    Eia

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