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Thread: Brave New World for rhetoric reading week 36+

  1. #1
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    Has anyone read Brave New World in a while? It's referenced so often by Neil Postman in Amusing Ourselves to Death that I wondered if it would be appropriate to read it next, either in addition to 1984 or in place of it. Postman posits that our contemporary entertainment-focused culture looks more like Huxley's vision of the future than Orwell's. Marcia or somebody, can you weigh in on this?
    Can't believe - we're at the end of Year 4! We fininshed the complete cycle and I'm graduating one this month! He's off to Samford and the other is gearing up to go through ToG again, now at the Rhetoric level. Thanks so much, Marcia & Co. It's been a good education for us all.

  2. #2
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    Jul 2006
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    I like Brave New World better than 1984. But they are starkly different.

    I imagine that TOG may have had to choose between the two.

    You'll want to read it yourself first as I think the topics are in some ways more explicit than in 1984.

    For accuracy, I think it does a better job. Both are chilling.

    Came back to add that in college I also read Walden Two by BF Skinner it was unlike the other two a positive Utopian novel. I still think Brave New World is the most accurate in terms of what our society is becoming.
    Pat
    "Of two evils, choose neither."
    Charles H. Spurgeon
    http://www.spurgeon.org/mainpage.htm

  3. #3
    We are week 24 of year 4 and I wondered about Brave New World, as well. I read it in high school and had forgotten most of it. After rereading it a second time, I found Brave New World to be very explicit and inappropriate. I like 1984, but loved reading the book Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. It is a book about censorship in the future. 1984 is interesting, but a little dark, in my view.

  4. #4
    Forgive me for quibbling here ...

    Fahrenheit 451 is actually about the effect of encroaching media on society. The censorship was an offshoot of that, but Bradbury never meant for censorship to me the main theme.

    The media theme is quite chilling on its own.

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