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Thread: File Folder Suggestion

  1. #1
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    File Folder Suggestion

    I'm reviewing the Tapestry Teacher Training Videos to prepare to help new moms in my small co-op. I reviewed the "Out of the Shrink Wrap" video today.

    One of the things Marcia suggests is setting up various file folder boxes at first to allow for flexibility. As a new David Allen fan I couldn't help notice both the box of folders and the labels on the folders.

    Allen is a productivity guru with a huge following and one of his suggestions is to use an inexpensive label printer to print labels of files; he believes they are easier to read and use. He also does not like using the labels of hanging file folders because they take a lot of effort to set up and change. He suggests that if you must use hanging folders due to the file cabinet you use, that you hang one regular folder inside one hanging folder and label the regular folder.

    Now, these two ideas violate one of the things Marcia tells us: they are more expensive: if you don't have a label-maker, you would have to buy one, and you'd be using two of each file.

    BUT David Allen tells the reader of his book over and over that you want your system to be as easy to use as possible because, yes, while you are setting it up you may even enjoy doing it, but a day will come when you have the flu and you'll still need to use the system. If you can't use it on that day it is likely you won't use it at all. While he writes to business people, I think if anyone knows what that ugly flu day looks like its a home school mom so I throw this idea out for those who might be interested.
    Pat
    "Of two evils, choose neither."
    Charles H. Spurgeon
    http://www.spurgeon.org/mainpage.htm

  2. #2
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    Thanks for sharing, Pat!
    I'd say that over the years I made some "pretty" organizational systems, discipline charts, etc. and they ended up not working for me because they were too complicated/too expensive/cumbersome. So, I certainly agree that you want something that works for an "ugly flu day." The easiest thing I found ... for my family ... in terms of organizing Tapestry, was to keep a binder on each student's desk. That binder had 36 tabs (to match the 36 week plans). EVERYTHING assigned for that week, including math, science, etc. went behind the appropriate tab. On my desk, I kept my teacher notebook that was divided according to the day of the week. It had a weekly page ("teacher planning chart" on the Loom) that I wrote notes on such as "review David's math lesson" on Wednesday or "check Todd's research" on Thursday. Behind the day tabs, I put quizzes/tests that I didn't want the kids to see ahead of time.

    It's good to share other ideas and help newcomers along in their journey. Does anyone else have any ideas as to ways to organize a week's work?

    Blessings,
    Dana C. in TN
    Vice President
    Lampstand Press

    "Let my teaching fall like rain and my words descend like dew,
    like showers on new grass, like abundant rain on tender plants.
    I will proclaim the name of the Lord. Oh, praise the greatness of our God!"
    Deut. 32:2-4

  3. #3
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    Hey, Pat

    I know the guru of which you speak. I actually followed one of these two pieces of advice and got a labeler for my home system. In trying to faithfully use it, I actually find it MORE trouble to use/maintain than simple handwritten labels that I can dash off in a heartbeat without finding, setting, peeling, and afixing the machine label. I can read my labels easily because my handwriting is passably neat.

    I disregarded his advice re: hanging file folders because I find that pawing through a lot of equally sized file folders is HARDER than going to an easily-moved-because-on-runners hanging file folder that contains (usually) 1-5 folders at most. I like it that they have organizational category labels that allow me a different "level" of organization than using ALL file folders does. PLUS there are times when I want to simply put a single piece of paper (such as a receipt or, in case of school, a half-completed assignment or recently-graded paper) into that hanging folder temporarily but it doesn't fit the organizational structure of existing file folders. I know David would say, "Make a file folder!" But, why make a new file folder for one temporary piece of paper? AND use a labeler to boot? That's not easier for me.

    While I respect the guru, I think that we should do what works for us. Being a guru myself (sort of...) I advise what works for me, just as David does. I just leave you more latitude to do it your own way! (That was meant to be funny!) For me, handwritten labels and hanging file folders are my cup of tea, so I still sip them! PLEASE be released to develop your own system. In the words of Elizabeth Bennet: "These are *your* files. [Neither] Marcia [nor David] will ever know!"
    Last edited by Marcia; 04-07-2012 at 10:08 AM.
    Blessings,
    Marcia

    No one can do me a greater kindness in this world than to pray for me.
    --Charles Spurgeon

  4. #4
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    Hey Marcia, I did catch that reference to the 30,000 foot level view in the lesson planning 101 episode.

    I agree you have to go with what works. I like the labeler idea, but nice handwriting is not a trait of anyone in my household so that might make the neatness of it more appealing (and easier to read on a bad day). And my labler is close to hand, that is also an important part of ease of use.

    And in fairness I should admit that I am taking his ideas to a totally paperless format in a lot of areas like this. It's been especially helpful with my older students to have them do their assignments on the computer and then print them out when necessary.
    Last edited by Pat; 04-07-2012 at 06:03 PM.
    Pat
    "Of two evils, choose neither."
    Charles H. Spurgeon
    http://www.spurgeon.org/mainpage.htm

  5. #5
    President, Lampstand Press
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    I don't know if my Dad read that book in my distant past or what, but that reference to 30,000 feet has been in my vernacular for YEARS, so I'm not sure if I got it from him or not. Yeah, paperless is my drift as well. I send emails to myself all the time with stuff I want to reference, and have you seen the free "Evernote" software? I love that.
    Blessings,
    Marcia

    No one can do me a greater kindness in this world than to pray for me.
    --Charles Spurgeon

  6. #6
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    Yes, I am familiar with Evernote. I too love it. I got interested in Allen only through Evernote.

    I sent in a suggestion behind the scenes about the time I posted about the file folders that reference an article about Evernote. I'll be curious to hear if you hear about it. It does not however suggest using Evernote to Tapestry (how's that for mysterious).

    I've been busily scanning in the huge stack of ripped out recipes that I saved but are so unwieldy that I never use them. Now, I can search them for anything I want.
    Last edited by Pat; 04-07-2012 at 06:06 PM.
    Pat
    "Of two evils, choose neither."
    Charles H. Spurgeon
    http://www.spurgeon.org/mainpage.htm

  7. #7
    I am wishing I could tag folks like on facebook. Spoiled by technology I am. My question is for Dana C, I think I met you in Cincy this past weekend! Until what age did you sit the folder on your childs desk with everything in it. It sounds like it would really work for me but I wonder until what age did you find this helpful for your students.

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