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Thread: Y2 w12 Faerie Queene discussion on magic

  1. #1
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    Y2 w12 Faerie Queene discussion on magic

    I'm preparing for our lit discussion this week and want to include the optional topic of biblically evaluating magic. Both in the week plan teacher notes and the section on magic in the "Teaching Rhetoric Literature" document say that there are three sub-categories of magic, but they only describe the first two. There is a footnote in the teacher notes that indicates that the 3rd subcategory will enter our lit studies later. I would like to read the notes related to that 3rd subcategory for my own background and in anticipation of questions from my students. Where in my year plans do I find the description of speculative or fictional magic? (I own all four years.)

    Many thanks,
    Monica
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." Jeremiah 29:11

  2. #2
    Hi, Monica! The third subcategory never did enter out Lit studies, and I'm afraid the reference to it is a typo! I do apologize for the wild goose chase, though I hope it will be good news for you that actually there is nothing else to read on the topic!

    Christy Somerville
    Director for Rhetoric Literature
    Lampstand Press

  3. #3
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    Thanks, Christy. I did research this a little bit and found this article on Crosswalk.com. http://www.crosswalk.com/faith/spiri...sion.html?ps=0
    I thought it offered food for thought.
    Monica
    Last edited by Renaissance Mom; 11-18-2013 at 06:49 AM.
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." Jeremiah 29:11

  4. #4
    That's a very interesting article, Monica! His approach and some of his conclusions closely parallel what I've been playing with on the subject of magic for the last five to ten years. Honestly, this article is very encouraging to me because so far (for the last decade) I hadn't found anybody else who seemed to approach the issue in this way.

    I appreciate, especially for your sake, that his article addresses the "third nuance" that I didn't get to--which he might describe as magic which is a metaphor or literary device. I did not address this kind of literary magic in TOG because I realized that doing it justice would have taken up far more class plan space than I had available, in a variety of different week-plans. (The "magic as a literary device" topic could have been addressed at length and in detail with the Faerie Queene, The Tempest, Don Quixote, The Rape of the Lock, several of the poems that we study in early Year 3 with Romanticism, The Hobbit, plus a few others I'm probably forgetting.)

    However it is obviously an extremely relevant topic for literary studies. It's great to see an article like this, because the author really seems to care what all of the Bible has to say about the topic, and seems to recognize how complex it is. Also, I like how he sees what I think is a very real connection between use of magic and our functional theology and sin natures.

    So, thank you for the article and for your thoroughness in studying this topic! It's wonderful to kick around these questions with other teachers, and I love that thinking through this out loud to you this morning has reminded me of my personal dependence on God. I will take that thought with me into my day, trying to align my plans with His instead of trying to force His to align with mine!

    Christy
    Last edited by cjsomerville; 11-18-2013 at 09:21 AM.

  5. #5
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    I love it when God knits together these lovely patterns!

    I anticipate that our students will ask about magic in some of their favorite books -- we often refer to examples from The Lord of Rings when discussing lit concepts before applying them to our lit work. It's easy to understand that we could view medieval lit through the lens of the LOTR, but it cracks me up that we also use Star Wars just as often! (I have a slide with Luke and Han Solo in my slide set as an example of character foils.).

    Monica
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." Jeremiah 29:11

  6. #6
    Lol! Did you know that Roy Maynard (editor of Fierce Wars and Faithful Loves, the version of Faerie Queene that we use) explicitly connects Faerie Queene to Star Wars in his introduction? If you haven't read it, do! It's only a page or two long, and spot-on! :-D

    Christy

  7. #7
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    I'll have to grab my daughter's copy and read the intro. She is using the Maynard copy, while I am reading it out of the big, fat Norton. I did catch the footnote about the quatrains and the theme song from Gilligan's Island, though. I couldn't resist embedding a link to a YouTube video of the GI theme song into our Moodle page. I'll see on Thursday if any of my students will take up my challenge to sing one of the quatrains for us. My daughter has already declared that she won't do it. Bummer.
    Monica
    "For I know the plans I have for you," declares the Lord, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future." Jeremiah 29:11

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